What is raw video? omg video footage😲😲😲😲 - TECHNO NEWSPAPER
SUBTOTAL :

TECH

TECH
What is raw video? omg video footage😲😲😲😲

What is raw video? omg video footage😲😲😲😲

Short Description:
What is raw video? full detail raw video how to use raw video

Product Description

What is raw video?


WHAT IS RAW VIDEO:- today we're gonna be talking about RAW video. Specifically, we're here to clear up some misconceptions about RAW and help give a good idea about when is the good time to use RAW and when should I use other video formats? RAW is basically untampered with sensor data directly from the camera. Any decision you're gonna make about it in terms of white balance or exposure. That's what's gonna happen in post-production as opposed to in the camera. That's not to say that you don't have to like get your aperture right on your lens or anything like that. You still have to do that. So in the RAW to video process. There are a lot of things that happen but here are kind of the basics. At first, you start out with a Bayer Pattern so you've got four different photo sites. Two green, one blue, one red and those four photo sites will one day become a full-grown pixel. In the process, you're going to have edge refinement so if you're looking at my face right now. I've got a beard and it's kind of fuzzy but the edges of the beard, hairs themselves or the side of my face. That has to be reconstructed inside of the camera and there are different algorithms that you can use to make that really nice and sharp and clean. From there, you'll also gonna have things like noise management because let's face it. Sensors, they can get really noisy especially in shadows. Shadows just love to light up with little dots of grains of blue and red and green here and there and either the camera itself or your post-production software has to take care of removing some of that noise so that you don't end up with a really gross looking image. After that, you have to take the image and apply a white point and do a colour space conversion so you have to go from all these ones and zeros to something like Rec 709 or Rec 2020, something that's actually visible to the human eye. Finally, there's tone mapping that'll take the data from the sensor and turn it into something like ARRI Log C or Sony Log or Canon Log, one of those sort of curves. And all of that takes place either in-camera, like a standard Log scenario or if you're working with RAW, you have sensor data that's turned into ones and zeros inside of the camera but then everything else happens outside of the camera. Your white balance, your colour space, your tone mapping. It's all determined inside of software later. And one of the benefits is companies can add new algorithms for edge refinement and out of gamma colour handling and noise management and all of that sort of stuff. RED actually recently did this with their IPP2 colour science so if you take footage from 2007, 2008 shot on a RED camera, you can actually apply the new IPP2 colour science inside of REDLINE-X or Final Cut or whatever you're working with your RED footage. And you'll have sharper edges, you'll have less noise than the image. You'll have better handling of highlights and really saturated colours. One of the really cool things with Apple ProRes RAW is that Apple improves Final Cut Pro X's de-layering algorithms. Any footage that you shot with ProRes RAW will gain those new algorithms and have the ability to look even more pristine than it did when it first came out of the camera. Then you've got kind of this half RAW, half not formats like Blackmagic RAW. You're de-layering, your edge refinement, your noise management, your sensor profiling. All of that happens inside the camera and then things like tone mapping, colour space transforms and your white balance can all be controlled outside of the camera and your post-production process. The benefit to that is that all of these very compute-intensive processes happen inside the camera so playback of these files can go much faster on your computer. You're not having to figure out how to take these four different photo sites and turn them into a pixel so you still have your metadata controls that come along with RAW without having to give up the processing power of your computer. One of the downsides is Blackmagic can make changes to edge refinement, sensor profiling and noise management but those refinements can only take place to updated firmware of the camera and will only benefit new footage that is shot. You won't be able to give new life to old footage like you can with RED, Sony, Canon and Apple ProRes RAW. So there are benefits and drawbacks to doing that halfway scenario. Back to the idea of Log, the question is well, if there are these benefits to RAW of making those decisions later, do I really need to always shoot RAW to be able to get the prettiest, most beautiful image that I can from my production? And the answer is no. In many cases, people would shoot a camera like the ARRI Alexa using ProRes 4444 for there are a lot of fours in that one. They'll shoot a format like that in ARRI Log C and they've got as much flexibility in post-production as they need. There are lots of feature films that have shot this way. There are feature films that have used ProRes 4444 XQ for their VFX plates and done the majority of their shooting in ProRes 4444. You can shoot commercials on Apple ProRes 422 on an ARRI and still get a beautiful image. The situations where you're really gonna want to use RAW are in situations where you run in gone. Maybe you don't have as much control over things like your exposure and white balance while you're in the field. Other scenarios are where maybe you have to have content that gets remastered over time. You're gonna shoot something now but you're gonna need to go back to that footage a year or two later. We're actually doing in-house right now. So we're taking footage that was shot pre-IPP2 and applying IPP2 technology to it now so we're getting much better quality images than we did a year ago. There are some situations where RAW definitely has its benefits but you do not have to shoot RAW to be able to have great looking footage and in fact, shooting RAW is not going to give you significantly more dynamic range, you're not gonna suddenly be able to work in HDR.  You can do those things with standard Log footage. One of the other big misconceptions that we've run into with RAW is that the idea of whether or not you can transcode from one codec to RAW but the thing is, RAW is only RAW if it's actually sensor data and you cannot transcode from something that wasn't RAW,0 to begin with to RAW and if you have RAW, to begin with, you can't transcode from that to another version of RAW because RAW is only a capture codec. You can only ever capture in RAW. You can't transcode to it. By nature, RAW is not transcoded from something else. So here's a challenge for you. Go to our website, lumaforge.com. Go to the Portfolio page, and we'd love to know if you can figure out which videos we shot RAW, which ones we shot Log and which ones we shot just standard video. Leave your thoughts down in the comments below and the person